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    Missile Defense

Technology has always found its greatest consumer in a nation's war and defense efforts. Since the last attempts at a "Star Wars" defense system, has technology changed considerably enough to make the latest Missile Defense initiatives more successful? Can such an application of science be successful? Is a militarized space inevitable, necessary or impossible?

Read Debates, a new Web-only feature culled from Readers' Opinions, published every Thursday.


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lchic - 10:13pm Mar 19, 2002 EST (#696 of 715)

Wales : Land Area 20,761 sq km (8,019 sq miles) http://www.worldatlas.com/webimage/countrys/europe/ukw.htm

Global warming GU archive : http://www.guardian.co.uk/globalwarming/archive/0,7364,395146,00.html

UK facts: http://www.cia.gov/cia/publications/factbook/geos/uk.html

lchic - 10:17pm Mar 19, 2002 EST (#697 of 715)

An iceberg coming via the back door may reek havoc .. any chance of thowing a noose from a boondoggle around a berg and dragging it up to a desert area where drinking water is valuable ?

?!

mazza9 - 10:17pm Mar 19, 2002 EST (#698 of 715)
Louis Mazza

lchic:

Since you choose to disparge me and my daughter....shame on you.

???? "... spotlight has moved from Cuba to the Antartic where a chunk of ice the size of WALES has broken off the Southern Continent .. it next broke down to ONE THOUSAND Iceburgs ..", (or maybe 999 or 1001 but who's counting?)

Is the Antartic anywhere near the Antarctic? I visited the Arctic when I was in the Air Force. Are Iceburgs cold cities like Point Barrow, (been there) or are they like icebergs, (you know the thing that the Titanic ran into)?

Talk about diversion. Your post should be made at the Global Warming forum not here but hey, you like to divert people when you can't reposnd in a polite, intelligent fashion.

Have a nice day.

LouMazza

lchic - 10:43pm Mar 19, 2002 EST (#699 of 715)

    Since you choose to disparge me and my daughter....shame on you.
You misread. mAzzA suppose you are a genius albeit misdirected .. then, evenso ... there's always a chance that the next generation take on board what they glean from the parental generation, augment it with their own new information, to develop an improved understanding of the world around them. Goodness who'd want the next generation to think like the last - who often didn't!

And no my post is for here ... i'm asking 'here' and that's where all the dollars are put ... can 'here' harness an iceberg in a useful manner for drinking purposes ... for if that's not possible .. why waste money on boondoggles when practical matters need instant attention :)

lchic - 10:54pm Mar 19, 2002 EST (#700 of 715)

8000 square miles of fresh water - Ocean Deep and Mountain High - yours for the taking !

manjumicha2001 - 11:59pm Mar 19, 2002 EST (#701 of 715)

Lou

Don't be so sensitive. After all, our jabs here and there sure beats bullets in a war, wouldn't you say?

Btw, since when calling one a member of NRA equates to a swearing?

manjumicha2001 - 12:10am Mar 20, 2002 EST (#702 of 715)

Rshow

Your point about Enron is well taken but wouldn't the geopolitical equivalent of Enron debacle be a global nuclear winter, no? Not a comforting analogy......

lchic - 01:12am Mar 20, 2002 EST (#703 of 715)

boon·dog·gle

boon·dog·gle Pronunciation Key (bndōgl, -dgl) Informal n. An unnecessary or wasteful project or activity.

A braided leather cord worn as a decoration especially by Boy Scouts. A cord of braided leather, fabric, or plastic strips made by a child as a project to keep busy.

intr.v. boon·dog·gled, boon·dog·gling, boon·dog·gles To waste time or money on a boondoggle.

http://www.dictionary.com/search?q=boondoggle see also

lchic - 06:31am Mar 20, 2002 EST (#704 of 715)

This is interesting:
    Many North Americans now travel to Mexico for dental work and minor surgery, as prices are considerably lower. Pharmaceuticals are widely available and at prices much lower than the U.S. or Canada. Doctors are well trained and they even do house calls! Health insurance is available and it is inexpensive.
    Violent crime in Mexico is less of a problem than in the United States or Canada. Guns are not allowed. Mexican law is hard on violent criminals. You can feel much-safer-walking the streets in Mexico than in most other cities in North America. http://www.virtualmex.com/general.htm
The USA hasn't got the grasp of 'safety' in the homland ... yet .. practise makes perfect ... Mexico knows how to keep people alive - the USA doesn't!

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